Wednesday, 22 August 2012

LIVING LEGEND: Bolt wins from within in new Gatorade ad spot

THE EYES HAVE IT: A still from the new ad spot.

Giving free rein to his inner tried-and-true champ, Usain Gold is a man on a mission in his latest video commercial for sport drink manufacturers Gatorade's new chewables. While there are references to the recent London Olympics, the ad did not air during the Games as the company was reportedly not among the official Olympic sponsors.

In the clip, Bolt (now 26 years old) portrays a mysterious hooded character that we follow along the busy city streets as he eventually makes his way into the Olympic stadium. With his game face on, the superstar sprinter looks ready to decimate the competition, but not before popping a piece of the chewable Gatorade into his mouth.

Check out the brilliant clip below:



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2 comments:

  1. to the writer of this article - the Olympic sponsors are known, factual pieces of information that can be easily found, so it is incorrect to say that Gatorade was 'reportedly' not a sponsor. They either were or they weren't. Simple.

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  2. I believe Tallawah means well in dubbing Usain Bolt Usain "Gold" but consider the role Wellesley Bolt has played in his son's life in giving him his identity and the discipline to reach the pinnacle upon which he stands. In changing his name to whatever other "honourable" name we may want him to wear, we should never remove the honour of his father's name which signifies his identity and his inheritance, both of which were forcibly removed from his forebears who came from Africa in yokes and chains.

    Jamaica has the crushing dishonour as a nation of having too many of our fathers disregard their children and thus have not earned the right to have their names proudly carried by their children.

    Usain Bolt has earned the honour of carrying his father's name and his father the right for his name to be carried by his son with the dignity it deserves before the whole watching world.

    So although you mean well Tallawah, please find another way to acknowledge Usain's achievements that does not exclude his father.

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