Friday, 14 October 2016

CHAT ’BOUT: Armadale justice, hurricane preparedness, and Thwaites on Trump

“I think people are flocking to Trump, whatever he says or does, because he represents the antidote, the counterpoint to what they consider to have been the impudence of the electorate in electing a Black man to occupy the White House. And worse now, albeit unspoken but deeply objected, that a woman could be elected to follow Obama. As we look on, recognizing how derivative our economy and culture have become to the United States, must we not take the time, at all levels, to refine and strengthen the values and attitudes we want to hold in common?” – Opposition spokesman on education and Gleaner columnist Ronald Thwaites weighing in on the Trump phenomenon and liberal enterprise
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“The point I’m making is that you can never be too prepared. We are dealing with something major. There are many variables in nature that we can’t necessarily forecast a long time ahead of their recurrence. We can’t forecast subtle paths that hurricanes will take. You can’t forecast that a rift or a trough will hold or not hold for a length of time. To not put people on alert with enough time to prepare themselves would be irresponsible.” – CDEMA head Ronald Jackson talking regional disaster preparedness in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, which devastated Haiti and parts of Cuba
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“Education is the strongest imperative on the social agenda. There is little comfort in the tinkering that is called reform and transformation. There are elements but largely they are moreso expressions of good intention. Education has neither been reformed nor transformed. Education has had the same results for 50 years at least, remarkably. Put another way, this is the 50th anniversary of the 70:30 allocation of primary-school children to secondary school.” – Former Jamaican Prime Minister and UWI Distinguished Fellow Edward Seaga reflecting on the state of the island’s education system as agent for social change
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“Where else would the kids who do not have access to information technology get the information they need? If they need to access curriculum books they cannot afford, where are they going to get it? Not everybody has access to, or can use, a computer, so the books remain an important part of the library. To remain relevant to the entire society, the library realizes that it needs to continue to expand on its ICT initiatives to ensure that we are providing information to everybody.” – Jamaica Library Service Chairman Paul Lalor reaffirming the JLS’ role in spreading knowledge and nation-building 
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“This is a victory! [We] had instituted suits against the Government for the way in which the girls were treated, the manner in which they were housed and, ultimately, breaches of their rights in terms of inhumane treatment and care conditions. This really is a huge victory for the girls. We think that it’s something that should put the girls along the continued path to really dealing with the issues that they have, [but] we’re not saying that the money is going to cure everything.” – Children’s Advocate Diahann Gordon Harrison responding to news that six former wards of the St. Ann-based Armadale Juvenile Correctional Centre (gutted by fire in 2009) are to receive millions in compensation from the state






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