Tuesday, 15 November 2016

CHAT ’BOUT: The problem with coal + Respecting domestic workers + Welcome to the Trump era

“The world is now going in a different direction, where consensus will be harder to achieve, and where it’s somewhat less stable and predictable. If you look at Brexit, if you look at Trump, it’s a new era and we are not yet fully on top of fully understanding it. So one of the lessons I would learn from this is that you can’t assume that the future is going to resemble the past, a natural extension of where things have been progressing.” – Former justice minister Mark Golding reflecting on the global status quo after the recent historic election of businessman Donald Trump to the US presidency
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“People are entitled to their views, but coal is a 19th century technology. It is time for us to move forward, and it is time for us to take the position that we want development and we want industry, and we want business, and we want jobs for our people. But not at the expense of public health and the climate.” – Environmentalist Diana McCaulay speaking out in the wake of Sally Porteous’ suggestion that Government authorize a coal plant, a multimillion-US-dollar investment, at Alpart in St. Elizabeth
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“This convention protects domestic workers and ensures that they receive decent wages and protects them from sexual harassment. We want to eliminate unpaid care work, but we also want to address care work that is underpaid. So this is a piece of a much bigger revolution that we hope the next century will be about.” – UN Women’s Executive Director Madame Phuzile Mlambo-Nganka welcoming the Jamaican government’s ratification of the ILO Convention 189 – the Domestic Workers’ Convention
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“Jamaica receives the highest share of individuals deported from the USA on criminal grounds, with those committed for criminal offences accounting for around 90 percent of Jamaican deportees. It is now time for us to bring the full force of the talent and the resources of our Diaspora to this problem.” – Jamaican Ambassador to Washington, Audrey Marks, addressing the recent Trailblazer Awards dinner of the Jamaica Diaspora North-East in New York
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“Through acts of personal sacrifice, volunteerism and empowerment, these unsung heroes continue to create opportunities to enhance the quality of life of their fellow citizens and have inspired other Jamaicans to advance themselves and be engaged in nation-building. The stories of their struggles to achieve reflect the resilience of the Jamaican people and their determination to build a just and equitable society in which all Jamaicans can strive to achieve their personal goals and ambitions.” – Jamaica National’s Earl Jarrett adding his voice to the wave of congratulations on the occasion of the Governor General’s Achievement Awards reaching the 25-year milestone






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