Friday, 10 February 2017

CHAT ’BOUT: Taming the crime monster + Making research more innovative + Holding our banks accountable

“We didn’t get here overnight, and our crime situation is not one-dimensional. There is no magic wand; there is no silver bullet, and there is no switch. We know it’s going to take the cooperation of all Jamaicans and the dedication of the security forces. And we are treating with the root causes rather than the symptoms.” – Minister of National Security, Robert ‘Bobby’ Montague, responding to the continued criticism of his ministry’s handling of the current crime situation in Jamaica
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“If the banks are not able to recover the real cost of providing services from the persons utilizing the services, this could lead to unintended consequences such as increased inefficiency, restriction of services, reduced capital in the banking sector and lack of further investment in technology systems to improve service delivery to consumers.” – The Jamaica Bankers Association responding to ,proposed amendments to the Banking Services Act to increase customer protection via the regulation of fees and charges
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“Nesta Carter, and to a lesser extent Jamaica’s entire programme, is being brought to shame and scandal by an action that is unjust in principle. Having listened extensively to almost all the discussions and analysis surrounding the issue, I find that, for the most part, the discussions have been charged with self-righteousness and emotionalism while missing the very essence of justice.” – Oral Tracey weighing in on the bigger picture surrounding Nesta Carter’s positive drug test that has stripped Team Jamaica’s male 4X100M team of the 2008 Beijing Olympics gold medal
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“The rules that govern copyright and intellectual property are becoming more complex, as technology and the world of publishing evolve. Because research is changing, it’s becoming more applicable and more relevant. Part of this is also the growth of what research is all about, because more and more students are doing research to be innovative, so there are researches around new products. People are interested in what their rights are and what they need to watch for.” – UWI Research Day Steering Committee Chairman, Dr. Denise Eldermire-Shearer, addressing a Gleaner Editors’ Forum on copyright laws and their impact on research
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“Clearly, when anybody in the arts is acknowledged for the work they do, it’s a big deal, because there is no monetary reward in the arts. What you hope and pray for is that your work makes a difference in other ways. So when you get an award such as this one, it allows you to get more recognition, more prominence to do what you may not have been able to do otherwise. It gives you legitimacy and a stamp of approval that is so important in the arts. – Co-founder and producer of the Calabash International Literary Festival, Justine Henzell, accepting the 2016 Gleaner Honour Award for outstanding contribution to the arts in Jamaica






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