Wednesday, 5 April 2017

CHAT ’BOUT: The trouble with corporal punishment + Is the UK prison deal dead? + Phillips’ challenge for tomorrow people

“The PNP needs you, the youth, to be part of that shaping of our vision, to be part of the shaping of the future, and we need for you to come and help us shape the programmes and policies that would help move this country forward. We need your energy, we need your idealism, and we need your courage.” – Newly installed People’s National party president, Dr. Peter Phillips, challenging the youth population to play a more active role in Jamaica’s journey forward 
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“CWC is at a defining time in its history, and Jamaica is a key part of that story. I am very excited about Stephen’s appointment, as he has some great ideas that I believe will continue to grow our Jamaica business and take it to the next level.” – President Flow/CWC (Caribbean), Garry Sinclair, welcoming the appointment of colleague Stephen Price as Managing Director of Flow Jamaica, effective June 1
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“We have always been advocating for it to be taken off the books, in the context that most teachers have stopped using corporal punishment as a means of disciplining children. Some of the other regulations, like the Early Childhood Act, have spoken to it. The fact that it is coming off the Education Act now is another round in the pathway for us to stop using that measure to discipline our students.” – Jamaica Teachers’ Association president Howard Isaacs on recent talk surrounding the use of corporal punishment as a disciplinary tool in local schools
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“Let’s dispel the notion that any administration that does not grab the millions of pounds that’s coming to us to accept prisoners from another jurisdiction is an administration that does not believe in building facilities or does not want facilities. We understand that facilities are needed, but they have to be purpose-built in such a way to enhance rehabilitation.” – State minister for National Security, Pearnel Charles Jr, weighing in on the debate sparked by the JLP government’s ejection of the UK prison deal
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“I posit that the nation does not currently have a cohesive vision. Are our leaders prepared to speedily put in place a team to craft a saleable national vision with the appropriate driving forces around with which to mobilize our nation? The country needs a ‘now’ vision that is able to spark the fire of hope in our people. Jamaica today needs a ‘cause’ vision, something to fight for.” – Sunday Observer columnist Rev. Al Miller commenting on the social status quo in Jamaica






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