Friday, 5 May 2017

CHAT ’BOUT: Saving our boys, Sir George Alleyne retires, 25 years of Reggae Sumfest, and more

“For the past 13 and a half years, I have been Chancellor and ever conscious of the responsibilities that come with following in the footsteps of persons of eminence and distinction. There was a princess of the royal blood, followed by three eminence West Indian lawyers, different in style perhaps, but all displaying the depth and fierce concern for the well-being of the institution as a whole and absolutely committed to upholding and enhancing its reputation.” – Outgoing UWI Chancellor, Sir George Alleyne, reflecting on his fruitful tenure 
** 

“This is the 25th anniversary of Reggae Sumfest, and we are alive and doing well. The festival is rapidly growing, and this year’s seven days of events, we are seeing a great level of enthusiasm in the marketplace. This has shown itself in the fact that all the tickets we offered as part of the early-bird special has been sold.” – Summerfest Productions Chairman, Joe Bogdanovich, updating Jamaicans on this year’s celebration of the festival’s quarter-century milestone 
** 

“Doctors are generally the most quiet in the country in the public sector; the nurses tend to be more vocal. But what I want is to be more vocal. I want to address issues that may arise while I am the president, and I think that it is important that we make the members understand that we are not just here.” – New President of the Jamaica Medical Doctors Association, Dr. Elon Thompson, on his vision for the body 
** 

“Saving our boys from becoming involved in gangs is important, but will this alone save Jamaica? What is clear is that violence against children and child maltreatment is a cultural phenomenon that goes way beyond gang violence. It is a phenomenon that will contribute to a population scarred by violence and riddled with maladaptive behaviours. Therefore, saving our boys from being recruited by gangs and from being disconnected from social institutions will not be enough to save Jamaica from a dark future.” – Deputy Registrar (Office of the Children’s Registry), Warren Thompson, riffing on the long-term effects of criminality on society’s most young and vulnerable 
** 

“The fact that the wealthy and well-connected get away with acts of corruption deepens the cynicism in the society. It breeds political alienation and disaffection and weighs down the democratic spirit. Jamaicans feel there is a law for downtown and another for uptown. We need to see more powerful uptown people dragged off to jail and disgraced like those scammers who were paraded at the airport [recently]. Friends of politicians and the rich must pay for their corrupt deeds.” – Columnist Ian Boyne highlighting the kind of disparities helping to fuel corruption islandwide






No comments:

Post a Comment