Monday, 5 November 2018

CHAT ’BOUT: The Reggae Girlz in history; Empowering future C’bean leaders; Deejay Spice beyond colour lines…

“I want to thank Spice for being brave to openly address this topic, which is complex and tied to hundreds of years of enslavement and colonization and being told we were less than animals, heathens and ugly, which we have internalized. [But] even though she is criticizing it, she is also profiting from it and therefore implicitly promoting these standards of beauty. We have deliberated how we might combat these damaging standards of beauty through the ranks of the education system, but it is not just our education system that needs to change to address this.” – Prof. Opal Palmer Adisa weighing in on deejay Spice’s “Black Hypocrisy” controversy 
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“I remain confident that our institutions of learning will rise to the challenge of inspiring our students with the notion that Caribbean people are inferior to no one; that we do have the capacity to govern ourselves, to build and maintain worthy institutions. These institutions, when locally established, work for us in ways in which no others can. If we observe carefully, objectively, we will see these truths demonstrated over and over again.” – President of the Caribbean Court of Justice, Adrian Saunders, on the pivotal role of education in empowering future C’bean leaders
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“We went out and did what we had to do and created history. After putting in the hard work we have accomplished what we set out to do and we are now celebrating the reward of our labour. What we have done for Jamaica we hope will have a big impact on the younger players coming up and even those around the world who are aspiring to achieve big things but are struggling at the moment.” – Reggae Girlz captain Konya Plummer on the significance of their historic achievement 
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“We live in fear because of our world-class murder rate, but in my view we should be just as appalled, and especially our women must be just as fearful at our world-beating rate of sex crimes! Jamaica is a highly sexualized society. Dancehall culture puts sex centrestage – and not in the context of love and a close and meaningful relationship – and pornography is readily available on every smartphone.” – Columnist Peter Espeut on the worrying increase in the number of reported homicides stemming from violent sex acts 
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“We are a chosen generation. We are the generation that will make regional unity into a reality. Believe in yourselves, believe in your institutions and, most of all, believe in this region.” – Class of 2018 valedictorian, Kai Bridgewater, exhorting fellow graduates at the UWI Cave Hill campus recently







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