Saturday, 30 November 2019

GUYS & DOLLS: High fashion, star power bring the ‘wow’ factor to this year’s MoDA collections

FASHION lovers, stylistas and tastemakers flocked to the Worthington in New Kingston on Thursday, November 21 to witness the unveiling of the 2019 MoDA collections – an evening of glitz and glam and gorgeous clothes. There were highlights aplenty and lots of famous faces in the crowd.

THE LUCKY ONES: Sub-10 king-turned fitness entrepreneur Asafa Powell and Alyshia Miller-Powell looked gorgeous as always from head to toe. 

CLASS ACT: The radiant Nicole McLaren-Campbell flashed her usually warm smile for the cameras. 

HOT STEPPERS: Bad boys of film and stage Everaldo Creary and Kadeem Wilson also put in appearances. 

TWO OF A KIND: The joined-at-the-hip pair of Garfene Grandison and Terri-Karelle Reid ‘suited up’ for the fabulous occasion. 

LIKE A BOSS: Distinguished gent Valon Thorpe, who recently celebrated another birthday, turned heads in midnight black. 

BAND MATES: The fly guys were out in their numbers.

WALK THIS WAY: Dozens of standout looks from top local design houses hit the runway.

Photography by Skkan Media








Tuesday, 26 November 2019

2019 TALLAWAH MUSIC AWARDS: Complete List of Nominations


> RECORD OF THE YEAR

“Blessed”
Shenseea feat. Tyga

“Cool It”
Spice

“Marijuana”
Jah Cure feat. Damian Marley

“Not Another Word”
Protoje feat. Lila Iké and Agent Sasco

“Owna Lane”
Teejay

“Rapture”
Koffee

“You Give Me Hope”
Alaine


> SONG OF THE YEAR

“Marijuana”
Jah Cure feat. Damian Marley

“Nah Mad (Ova Nuh Gyal)”
Munga Honourable

“Owna Lane”
Teejay

“Picture Perfect”
Bugle feat. Jada Kingdom

“Rapture”
Koffee

“So Saucy”
Kemar Highcon

“You Give Me Hope”
Alaine


> ALBUM OF THE YEAR

And Then
Christopher Martin

It All Comes Back to Love
Maxi Priest

Loyalty 
Morgan Heritage

More Work to Be Done
Third World

Parts of the Puzzle
Busy Signal

Rapture

Koffee

Royal Soldier
Jah Cure


> BEST NEW ARTISTE

Daddy1
Kemar Highcon
Koffee
Rhoda Isabella
Squash


> BEST REGGAE ARTISTE – Male

Bugle
Christopher Martin
Hezron
Jah Cure
Protoje
Romain Virgo
Tarrus Riley


> BEST REGGAE ARTISTE – Female

Alaine
Etana
Jada Kingdom
Koffee
Lila Iké


> BEST DANCEHALL ARTISTE – Male

Alkaline
Busy Signal
Ding Dong
Munga Honourable
Popcaan
Squash
Teejay


> BEST DANCEHALL ARTISTE – Female

Ikaya
Macka Diamond
Pamputtae
Shenseea
Spice


> BEST GOSPEL SONG

“Boast Inna God”
Alaine

“Lights”
Kevin Downswell

“Never Leave My Side”
Darien McCallum and Ricardo Williams

“Taste and See”
Joanna Walker

“You’re All I Need”
Curtis Rhoden


> BEST GOSPEL ARTISTE

Jermaine Edwards
Joanna Walker
Kevin Downswell
Rhoda Isabella
Stephen Murphy


> MUSIC EVENT OF THE YEAR

Appleton Signature Nights
Buju Banton: Long Walk to Freedom
Rebel Salute
Reggae Sumfest
Tracks & Records Live


> BEST MALE VOCAL PERFORMANCE

“Dutty Man”
Romain Virgo

“Lightning”
Mortimer

“Lights”
Kevin Downswell

“Wake Up”
Natel

“Young Girl”
Hezron


> BEST FEMALE VOCAL PERFORMANCE

“Sometime Love”
Sevana

“Sexy Badness”
Ikaya

“Streets Nuh Right”
Shenseea

“Stronger”
Althea Hewitt

“What Kind of World”
Marcia Griffiths


> PRODUCER OF THE YEAR

DJ Frass
Mario Dunwell
Notnice
Rvssian
Romeich Entertainment


> BEST ALTERNATIVE/SOUL/R&B/CLASSICAL ARTISTE

Al Third
Althea Hewitt
Craigy T
Natel
Nicky B


> BEST COLLABORATION

“Blessed”
Shenseea feat. Tyga

“Glow”
Christopher Martin and Romain Virgo

“I’m Alright”
Maxi Priest feat. Shaggy

“Na Na Na”
Third World feat. Chronixx

“Olympe Rosé Medley”
Dexta Daps, Ding Dong, Christopher Martin, Bibi Gardner and Munga Honourable

“That’s Not True”
Skip Marley feat. Damian Marley

“Unanswered”
Govana feat. Tarrus Riley


> BEST REGGAE SONG

“Beach and Country”
Morgan Heritage

“Love and Reggae”
Collie Budz

“Life Is a Poker Game”
Hezron

“Not Another Word”
Protoje feat. Lila Iké and Agent Sasco

“Picture Perfect”
Bugle feat. Jada Kingdom

“Rapture”
Koffee

“Reggae Music”
Kabaka Pyramid


> BEST DANCEHALL SONG

“Any Weather”
Vybz Kartel

“Best/Blessed”
Popcaan

“Big Baller (Benzema)”
Aidonia

“Cool It”
Spice

“Hail”
Quada

“Leader”
Masicka feat. Dexta Daps

“Nah Mad (Ova Nuh Gyal)”
Munga Honourable


>> Winners will be announced on Jan. 29









CULTURE VULTURE: Pantomime crew gearing up for another triumph / Last lap at Phoenix Theatre / Major cash awards for Poet Laureate’s Poetry Prize

LITERARY GOLD: Calling all Jamaican poets! Submit your best work for the National Library/Poet Laureate’s 2020 Poetry Prizes (four categories to choose from), and you could share in US$4000 in total prize money. The Helen Zell Young Writer’s Prize is open to poets aged 17-25 years; the Edward Baugh Prize is for poets 35 years and younger residing in East Jamaica (St. Thomas and Portland) and the Corporate Area; the Louise Bennett Prize is open to poets of any age from Central Jamaica (Clarendon, Manchester, St. Catherine, St. Mary and St. Ann) and the Michael Cooke Prize is for male poets only from the Western end of the island (St. James, Hanover, Westmoreland, St. Elizabeth and Trelawney). Deadline for submissions is December 20. For guidelines and more information, go to nlj.gov.jm/poetryprize/

THAT TIME AGAIN: Rucktion Junction is the title of the 2019/2020 LTM National Pantomime. Promising another helluva serving of vibrant entertainment for the entire family, the show (now well into rehearsals) is fusing community drama, family life and politics with ample humour. According to showrunner Anya Gloudon, the new production recalls such classic pantomimes as River Mumma and Man Deh Yah, and will feature a special tribute to icons like the recently departed Noel Dexter. One of Dexter’s songs, Gloudon tells us, is being freshly arranged for the show, which opens, as is the custom, on Boxing Day (Dec. 26), with a cast of seasoned veterans, recent additions and fresh faces.

THE FINAL ACT? Is the Phoenix Theatre really closing its doors for good? As industry people come to terms with the heartbreaking news, theatre manager David Tulloch and his team are gearing up for their swan song: two productions that will bring the curtain down and signal the end of an era. Up first is Jamaica Sweetest (Dec. 13-15), the third slice of Tulloch’s uber-popular musical revue, featuring Owen ‘Blakka’ Ellis, Rashiem Shepherd, Danielle Shepherd, Deanne Logan Johnson and Kathy Grant. A remount of the domestic dramedy Prayer Partner opens on Dec. 27 (for a brief run ending Jan. 5), with a cast comprising Tulloch, Ricky Rowe, Kathy Grant, Trishana Wright and Michael ‘Stringbeans’ Nicholson.








Monday, 25 November 2019

AT THE MOVIES: Two thumbs way up for crafty, stylish The Good Liar

THE COMPANY YOU KEEP: Mirren and McKellen toast to the future.

THE Good Liar is a taut cat-and-mouse thriller that blends intrigue, suspense and razor-sharp performances for a great cinematic event. You are riveted to the very end.

Helen Mirren plays Betty McLeish, a widow and former Oxford professor who longs for “companionship.” She turns to online dating, where she meets Roy Courtnay (Ian McKellen), a single older gentleman who is into finance and investments. They hit it off right away, and before you can say “geriatric,” Betty has moved Roy into her place, having grown increasingly fond of him.

But Betty’s grandson, Steven (Russell Tovey), a doctorate student, feels things are moving too fast between his grandma and this stranger. He tries to warn her, but she quickly dismisses his nagging concern.

When Roy introduces Betty to his accountant and money advisor, Vincent (Jim Carter), he not only invites her into an investment scheme, where she can “double her money in five years” but also to open a joint account – to pool her millions with Roy’s money. That’s when things really start to get interesting. 

If only Betty knew about Roy’s double life as a con artist. She would have spotted from afar that these two charmers are a team of swindlers looking to make their next big score. 

Stylishly orchestrated by director Bill Condon (Dreamgirls), with a screenplay by Jeffrey Hatcher (based on the novel of the same name by Nicholas Searle), The Good Liar scores points for its great pacing and intricate plotting, weaving a tale of greed and deception and vengeance. 

Mirren and McKellen vividly demonstrate why they rank among the most celebrated actors in the business, giving masterful lessons steeped in subtlety and depth, class and craft. Tyrone’s Verdict: A








Friday, 15 November 2019

THE BEAUTY PAGE: Joanna Johnson’s fly-girl essentials / More fruits for better mental health? / The ‘chilling’ effect

STAR QUALITY: From School of Drama to working in television (CVM’s Joint Tenants) to making strides in local theatre, actress Joanna Johnson has never failed to leave a lingering impression on both critics and audiences. This season, she burns a hole in the stage as the temperamental diva Becky in a remount of the hit gospel play Amazing Grace. Johnson, a 29-year-old natural who loves travelling, is now eyeing a foray into the film world and, fingers crossed, landing her first New York role someday soon. “I’ve been watching a lot of Broadway shows,” she tells TALLAWAH. “I hope to get to that level.” In the meantime, here are the beauty essentials helping her stay at the top of her game.

>> Face: Cetaphil moisturizer. “It’s great because I have such sensitive skin.”
>> Body: Jergen’s lotion.
>> Hair: Kantu’s natural line. “When I want to wear a weave, I’ll go with the straight extensions. I like wearing them with a side part.”
>> Perfume: Million. “The male version smells really, really nice. (Laughs).”

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: According to a recent study by Social Science & Medicine, even one extra daily serving of fruits and vegetables has the same soothing effect as eight days of long walks. As the study further points out, the researchers aren’t certain why but they do share that participants reported mental well-being just as high after eating more produce as after doing other calming activities.

COOL IT: Keeping your eye creams and gels chilled in the fridge can work wonders for your beauty game, especially when temperatures soar, according to Woman’s World. Per the mag’s beauty editors, patting cold creams or gels under the eyes quickly eases any puffiness caused by the heat while flushing out the trapped fluids that pool under your eyes. For more beat-the-heat benefits, they also recommend that you ‘chill’ your sunscreen, toning sprays, face masks and perfumes – to leave skin feeling cool and utterly refreshed.









50-SECOND MOVIE REVIEW: Harriet is an engrossing biopic and essential history lesson

RUN TO THE RIVER: Erivo (centre) leads a strong ensemble cast, including Odom Jr. and Monae

DID you know that the name Harriet Tubman was actually her mother’s name, which she took as her own when she became a free woman after fleeing to Philadelphia to avoid being sold? That’s one of the most fascinating facts from the new movie Harriet, which offers a compelling, deeply affecting cinematic rendering of the famed freedom fighter’s story.

If nothing else, this narrative (directed by Kasi Lemmons) epitomizes ‘strength of a woman’ as we follow the tale of ‘Minty’ (her original name) from rebellious slave girl in Dorchester County, Maryland to free woman to key member of the Underground Railroad committee, who made it their business to liberate scores of slaves from plantations and sun-baked fields across the United States.

Broadway star-turned-screen actress Cynthia Erivo turns in a bravura performance (sure to cop an NAACP Image Award nomination), portraying Tubman as a warrior, a woman of fierce determination and steely grit, who battles her way through vicious prejudice and racism, heartbreak (her husband remarries believing her escape had ended tragically) and countless other odds to do the work her spirit led her to do – and to reunite, at last, with her loved ones. 

Leslie Odom Jr., Joe Alwyn and Janelle Monae are strong standouts in the supporting cast. Tyrone’s Verdict: B+








Saturday, 9 November 2019

SOCIETY, SOCIETY: Cedella is on a winning streak … Gleaner appoints 2nd female Editor-in-Chief … PJ Patterson recuperating…

>> Undoubtedly, Cedella Marley makes our Top 5 Women of the Year list, after racking up several new accomplishments, including her strides with the Bob Marley Group of Companies (a new Marley musical is in the works), the release of her third children’s book, and recently copping the Bush Doctor Award at the Peter Tosh Awards. Cedella was in great company, alongside Steve DeAngelo, Douglas Gordon and Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, who were also honoured during the ceremony at Villa Ronai. 
**

>> And speaking of Cedella and Babsy, we join them in offering deepest condolences to the JFF and the bereaved family of slain female footballer Tarania Clarke, who lost her life quite gruesomely (following a stabbing incident) last Thursday in Half Way Tree. Clarke, who turned 20 in October and has played with the Reggae Girlz and club side Waterhouse FC, was expected to commence studies at an overseas college in January. 
**

>> Former Prime Minister P.J. Patterson, who was involved in a vehicular accident at his upper St. Andrew home last month, is said to be on the mend. We wish him a full and speedy recovery. 
**

>> The Gleaner Company has hired its second-ever female Editor-in-Chief. Kaymar Jordan, an award-winning career journalist from Barbados, took up the post on November 1. She succeeds Garfield Grandison (now the paper’s general manager) and follows in the footsteps of Wyvolyn Gager, their first female EIC. Jordan will be spearheading the newspaper’s upgrade of it print, digital and multimedia platforms. 
**

>> Team work made the dream work, says Thalia Lyn, in response to her recent induction into the PSOJ Hall of Fame. “It has been an amazing journey with my Island Grill team, and with a number of my long-term team members,” she said. “It is entirely to the credit of my ‘Supaah’ family that this beloved Jamaican brand is such a success.” Toast!









MUSIC OF THE NIGHT: ‘Way Off Broadway’ thrills concertgoers with showtunes and songs from the movies

WELL TUNED: Strachan and Harris led a terrific ensemble at the concert.

IT’s always an enormous delight when Jamaicans give their regards to Broadway. The faculty of the School of Music (Edna Manley College) put on a splendid two-night concert, dubbed ‘Way Off Broadway,’ inside the college’s Vera Moody Hall on the weekend, offering interpretations of modern classics and the kind of showtunes that draw standing ovations.

Into the Woods started things off, with the ensemble (lecturers portraying the baker, his wife, Jack and Little Red), giving a spirited take on the blame-game number “Your Fault,” after which Ana Strachan (as the witch) belted out “Last Midnight,” displaying the kind of vocal prowess for which she’s become known.

Up next, the exuberant “One” from A Chorus Line, followed by June Lawson channelling immense feeling into her rendition of “What I Did for Love.” Trevelle Clarke-Whyne managed to further raise the bar with her powerhouse lead on the hyper-rhythmic “Mama Will Provide” from Once on This Island.

Stephen Sondheim’s beloved masterpiece Company was also in the mix, providing great material for tenor Andre Adman, who performed an almost pitch-perfect “Being Alive,” before Strachan (the officiating celebrant), Carl Lee Scharschmidt (playing the groom) and Ruth Browne (as the reluctant bride) gave a droll send-up of “Getting Married Today.”

Who knew Kiss of the Spider Woman had been turned into musical? “Dear One” (about confinement and the pain of separation) got a haunting interpretation from Lawson, with supporting vocals from Adman, Strachan and Michael Sean Harris. 

Harris then put on his crown and dancing shoes for a rousing interpretation of “You’ll Be Back” from Hamilton, the acclaimed hip-hop-infused show about the American founding father, which also carries such high-voltage songs as “Wait for It,” a great showcase for Scharschmidt’s crisp, appealing vocals. 

Of course, a selection from Wicked had to be included. Browne and Harris were in their element singing “For Good,” full of soaring vocals and palpable emotion, setting the stage for Browne’s bring-them-to-their-feet performance of “Never Enough” and Trevelle Clarke-Whyne’s solid lead on “This Is Me” – both from the Hugh Jackman flick The Greatest Showman. In short, Way off Broadway was more than an enormous delight. Concertgoers got a splendid feast of musical theatre.









Thursday, 7 November 2019

HOT TOPIC: Did Juliet Holness go too far with her ‘sexy prime minister’ comments?

HOTTEST COUPLE: Andrew and Juliet Holness greet the cameras during one of their public appearances.

YOU can say this for Mrs. Juliet Holness MP: she stands by her man. Last Sunday, she told a throng of JLP faithful in St. Catherine: “We lucky we have a young prime minister, a prime minister whose body is tight and firm, who sexy cyaah done… A prime minister who can run, who intellectual and can work… and nuh sleepy sleepy.” Since then, the court of public opinion has been divided over her comments (“inappropriate,” “humorous”), sparking newspaper columns and letters to the editor. 

>> FOR 
Mark Wignall’s take: “In Jamaica we are used to our male politicians ‘bigging up’ their wives on the political podium… In this instance, a strong young Jamaican woman, who just so happened to be an elected member of parliament and is also wife of the prime minister, has proudly proclaimed that her man, her husband, has the intellect of a sage and the physical hardware to conquer any hill… Politics is a trade show. The message must be wrapped in happy colours, and the delivery presented to earn the best theatrical reviews. Juliet Holness knows this.” 

>> AGAINST 
Gleaner letter writer P. Chin’s take: “I wonder how Mrs. Holness would feel as a woman, a wife and a mother if her husband spoke about her like that while campaigning, describing her sex appeal and looks as an attribute for representational politics. It might sound funny in the moment, but it was in poor taste, and those who condone the comments are just as bad… Mrs. Holness should remember that she is the wife of the prime minister and first lady. She is a role model that many young people do look up to!” 

TALLAWAH’s take: A young and healthy prime minister with the stamina to go the distance in shark-infested waters – and a strong, supportive (and hilarious) wife by his side? Jamaica is very fortunate indeed.









AT THE MOVIES: Downton Abbey pours on the wit, drama and lots of sparkle

GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER: Smith, Carmichael and other cast members reprise their roles for Downton's big-screen debut.

THE avidly anticipated arrival of members of the royal family can really make people lose their minds. The evidence abounds in Downton Abbey: The Movie, a hugely enjoyable big-screen adaptation of the beloved British television series. The major highlight is a planned visit by King George V (Simon Jones) and Queen Mary (Geraldine James), who will be staying at the big house during a tour of Yorkshire.

To say that pandemonium ensues is a masterpiece of an understatement. As someone points out, with preparations for these kinds of occasions, there’s always a façade of grace and serenity on the surface and demented kicking below. And nothing could be further from the truth, as the house’s upstairs/downstairs set-up roars to life. Everybody has a role to play.

Of course, it’s the servants and footmen who have to do the heavy lifting, determined to put their best forward. But what catches them completely off guard is the news that their services won’t be required during the visit. The royal staff intend to handle everything, pushing the Downton staff into the background on their own turf! The stage is set for a huge fight, complete with devious little games and tricks.

Meantime, the lords and ladies of the house, including the Earl of Grantham, Robert Crawley (Hugh Bonneville), Lady Grantham, Cora Crawley and their lovely daughters Mary (Michelle Dockery) and Edith (Laura Carmichael) and the imperious Dowager Countess, Violet (Dame Maggie Smith), also have their hands full, grappling with matters both personal and pertaining to the visit.

There’s never a dull moment. Other highlights: Mr. Carson’s (Jim Carter) return to the big house, Tom Branson’s (Allen Leech) heroics and Thomas’ (Robert James-Collier) run-in with the law during a frisky boys’ night out. 

In the end, the Downton Abbey movie (penned by Julian Fellowes and directed by Michael Engler) is a real treat for loyal fans of the hit TV show and for those who hadn’t the foggiest idea that sarcasm is the lowest form of wit. Tyrone’s Verdict: B+









Monday, 4 November 2019

CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK: Spotlight on some 2019 Best Actor and Best Actress hopefuls

AS promised, this week we’re kicking off our annual rundown of the performances and productions that left such an impression on us that we deem them worthy of consideration for awards-season honours. We start things off with the leads:

>> BEST ACTOR 

We’re still raving about Michael ‘Stringbeans’ Nicholson’s captivating turn in Pit to Pulpit as a soon-to-be-ordained pastor with some shocking family secrets..... Straight Jacket has no shortage of domestic drama either, with Glen Campbell in fine form as a loving husband devastated to learn that, due to an episode from his wife’s past, another man may have fathered their only child….. John Chambers, meanwhile, could earn his first nomination in this category for his impressive work in It Stops Here as a brutish married man who uses his money to control his frustrated mistress and her greedy mother….. Quite similarly, Rodney Campbell did some of the strongest work of his career in Feminine Justice as an arrogant and abusive husband who meets his maker….. Not to be outshone, Stephen-Rhae Johnson took on the tragic Biblical prophet in the musical Isaiah with splendid results; Kadeem Wilson delivered some standout work as a barber with woman trouble in Special Cuts; Brian Johnson was simply enigmatic as a diligent Christian brother with issues in Yours, Truly; and Francois Medley hit all the right notes in Jesus Christ Superstar.


>> BEST ACTRESS

Sabrina Thomas brought the house down playing the nurturing but no-nonsense business partner Tina in Special Cuts….. Petrina Williams (Behind the Pulpit) gave a superlative turn as a newly appointed bishop grappling with opposition….. In Straight Jacket, Nadean Rawlins won us over with a first-rate performance as a wife whose past comes back to haunt her….. Maylynne Lowe was electric as an abused wife who gets some sweet revenge in Feminine Justice….. Aisha Davis stunned as the posh single mother/ go-getter whose daughter goes missing in Ananda Alert, opposite young Crystal Fletcher, who gave the most emotionally precise performance of her career so far; and Rosie Murray could return to the race this year, thanks to her clever portrayal of a ‘material girl’ in It Stops Here.

Stay tuned…









Friday, 1 November 2019

DRAMAFEST 2019: Three provocative new short plays delight and disturb

WOMAN SEEKS SPERM DONOR: “I’m a happily married man not looking for trouble,” declares Reggie Cooper (Andrew Jones), when his very attentive and attractive co-worker/project partner Passion March (Paula Thompson) does the unthinkable: seductively ask him to father the child that she desperately wants. “I’m almost 38, and I don’t have a man. I want to have a child,” she tells him, sharing her sob story. When Reggie respectfully declines the flattering offer, Passion goes berserk, revealing her true colours and launching a revenge plot that rocks the man’s world. That’s the basic premise of Poisonous Proposition, an engrossing and very well-acted mini play (penned and co-directed by Thompson) that offers a sobering reminder that women, too, have predatory instincts, and unsuspecting men (and their poor wives) had better storm-proof their marriages. Anthea Francis appears as Reggie’s shell-shocked spouse Monica, while Earl Brown guest stars as the boss at the consultancy company where Reggie and Passion work. [B]

CHOICES, CHOICES: What’s concealed in the dark always comes to the light. That’s arguably the biggest lesson nursing student and expectant mom Lily (a commanding Stacy-Ann Morgan-Duvalier) learns as action climaxes in Hidden Intentions, a slyly funny domestic dramedy, written and co-directed by Paula Thompson. Lily, a demanding but indecisive young lady, finds herself caught between two men – Bill (Arthur Allen), the struggling but loyal partner who treats her like a queen, and Dave (Andrew Jones), the part-time lover who is always on the move. Which of these two men is the father of Lily’s child? Given the less than ideal circumstances, is abortion the best route for her to take? As the pressure and the stress builds to an explosive culmination, Lily will have to make the toughest decisions of her life. Meantime, Thompson appears as a case worker with life-saving advice – who may know more than she’s letting on. [B]

AH YAH SO NICE: Gambling, cooked food, rum and dominoes. Men in some quarters in Jamaica want nothing more to keep them content before they have to go home to face the music. In the intense but often humorous Idlers’ Corner 2, a bunch of society rejects fit right in, passing the time at a deli/cook shop run by Miss Nettie (Creslyn Thomas). We meet betting man Sir G (Norris Chambers), womanizer Delco (Rory Roberts), deportee Rambo (Gary Blake), impressionable kid Youngie (Sanjay Matthews) and the rowdy troublemaker Hothead (Tesfa Edwards), who must always get his way or else. They reason, they fight, they hide from their women. In the end, Miss Nettie’s words of caution to Youngie ring hauntingly true: there’s nothing more important than spending your time productively and contributing to society. [B-]








SOUND BYTES OF THE WEEK: Delroy Chuck speaks out on the paternity-leave issue / Donna Hope champions brand Jamaica’s power and potential / Don Wehby on why education is still the key

>> “With our love for all things foreign, we are always open to foreigners who come bearing gifts. What we do not have is the full appreciation of our global cultural reach. Neither do we have a clear vision as to how to transform more aspects of our culture into tangible products… [We can] begin to create, market and monetize more products that are oriented around the brand that is Jamaica.” – Dr. Donna Hope in a post-Kanye West Sunday Service Observer column

>> “If you want a better Jamaica, our conversations shouldn’t start with International Monetary Fund and fiscal policy; our conversations should start with how we are going to have a great education system – from basic school right up to university. That is the conversation we should have as policymakers… Education is not an expense; education is an investment.” – GraceKennedy CEO, Senator Don Wehby, speaking at the Annual Scholars Awards at UWI Mona

>> “If you want paternity leave you must be living with the mother [of your child] for a few months before birth. If it’s your wife, no problem… All I’m saying is that fathers in Jamaica need to take responsibility for the children that they have fathered. It’s just unfair for the mothers to struggle with these children, and all the fathers believe that they are to do is to send ah money. That’s not enough.” – Justice Minister Delroy Chuck addressing residents in St. James